Tag Archives: The Lexington School

Arts

Our Latest UMGram: Many Helping Hands

Photo courtesy of Sarah Heller

This Mighty Lexington Art Teacher Joins the COVID-19 Fight
Armed with a home 3D printer and a Maker’s can-do attitude, Sarah Heller, an art educator at The Lexington School in Lexington, Kentucky, brought a unique set of skills to the design of a face shield prototype for frontline healthcare workers. As part of the maker movement the project was a great fit for Heller, but also represents a forward-looking way to think about art education as basic and essential.

Arts Resilience Initiative
LexArts and the Bluegrass Community Foundation in Lexington have teamed up with a generous core of foundation and other donors to offer financial relief funds to individual artists and arts organizations in the LexArts/BGCF service area impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The one-time grants are being provided on a first-come, first-served basis. You can read more about it on our website. Here is a link to more information about grant eligibility.

Photo by John Brooks of woman viewing Dorthea Lange exhibition at MoMA.

John Brooks: The Art World After COVID
We’ve invited a group of folks in the arts and culture world to write brief essays responding to a recent piece in Vulture by art critic Jerry Saltz, “The Last Days of the Art World… and Perhaps the First Days of a New One.” John Brooks, a Louisville artists, gallerist, and poet is our first featured response piece contributor. Brooks’ art practice was featured in a recent piece by Miranda Lash on UnderMain.

Artist Relief Trust
Led by the Great Meadows Foundation, Kentucky Foundation for Women, and private donors, and facilitated by ELEVATOR Artist Resource in Louisville, the Artist Relief Trust (ART) has been established to help support individual artists who live in Kentucky or several contiguous Indiana counties who are facing dire financial straits due to the COVID-19 shutdown. ART is funding rapid-response microgrants of $500 to as many artists as possible. Click on the above image to learn more about the effort. Here is the link to the easy-to-complete ART application.

ETC.,

The wonderful donor funds highlighted in this newsletter are generous, remarkable, and timely. In this catastrophic time so many Americans are accessing online arts and cultural content of all kinds from so many different sources to help them deal with their drastically changed circumstances. We are struck by the relatively paltry dollars allocated to the arts and culture sector in the relief package passed by Congress and signed by President Trump. According to a report by Americans for the Arts, the arts and culture sector represents 4.3% of national GDP and generates $166 billion of economic activity. In Kentucky, the sector contributes 2.5% of the state’s economy equal to $4.9 billion, and generates significant revenues for local and state governments. We think this is the right time to start considering how the arts and culture sector can have a significant seat at the table when political decisions are made about allocations of government funds. Some strategies that could be employed will be highlighted in future newsletters.

Our friends at the Lexington-focused Infinite Industries, a free cultural events promotion site, have moved to promoting remote events. The site, free to event creators and end users, was founded by Dmitry Strakovsky, who was interviewed recently on WEKU’s Eastern Standard, hosted by UnderMain’s own Tom Martin. Infinite Industries also now features online resources for all ages and is encouraging event creators and promoters to use the site to disseminate event information.

George Herman “Babe” Ruth, New York Yankees, from the Goudey Gum Company’s Big League Chewing Gum series (R319), The Jefferson R. Burdick Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Are you missing the start of baseball season like we are? Remember that box of baseball cards which included a Mickey Mantle rookie card that your mother gave away? You can at least do a deep dive into the most extensive collection of baseball cards outside of the Baseball Hall of Fame, a thirty-thousand-plus card collection donated by Jefferson Burdick, a Syracuse, New York, electrician who apparently never attended a baseball game.

Pay Nothing Until April, 2003, Edward Ruscha, born 1937. ARTIST ROOMS Acquired jointly with the National Galleries of Scotland through The d’Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund 2008 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/AR00047.

The Tate Modern offer a terrific online survey exhibition of the work of influential American American artist, Ed Ruscha. The artist, known for his work in which text is superimposed over landscapes and often idealized images, talks about his practice in this excellent video.

We’re always interested in hearing what you think about UnderMain. You can send comments, suggestions, and pitches to UM@under-main.com.

Food, housing, health, safety; so many vital needs to be met right now. If you are able, please consider providing needed assistance to organizations supporting our neighbors in our communities. Please also consider, if you are able, donating to one of the financial relief efforts highlighted in this newsletter, or arts and culture organizations and institutions, most of which are in survival mode and trying to find paths to reopening their doors after the crisis.

Most of all, please stay safe.