Art Shechet

Art Shechet is Co-Publisher of UnderMain.

Arts

This Mighty Lexington Art Teacher Joins the COVID-19 Fight

The lack of adequate personal protection for frontline healthcare workers has been a major failure of our national preparation for the COVID-19 pandemic. Sarah Heller, an art educator at The Lexington School in Lexington, Kentucky, decided to join in the efforts to find solutions to the shortage of PPE by developing a prototype for face shields which would offer a higher degree of protection in healthcare settings. As part of the maker movement, Sarah brought technical skills and capabilities and the requisite can-do attitude to this vital project. She responded in writing to questions. Her account of the project and also its implications for how and what we teach our children is a path into a future where art education becomes absolutely basic and essential.

How did you get the idea to develop a face shield prototype?

I woke up on March 25th at 5 A.M. to a blast of text messages from Dr. Sylvia Cerel who was on a mission to find a resource from all who had technology to get involved in aiding the PPE crisis locally. I know her directly from being a parent at The Lexington School and she knew I had a 3D printer in my classroom. She gave me the spark to research and get involved. It became my greatest challenge as to how I could use my small classroom printer to create a prototype device for making face shields. How can one person with a small 3D printer have any effect?

Process: A.) Identify the need. How can a rapid prototype fill a need for PPE supply? B.) What’s out there in the Maker Space world as far as open source files and designs being shared? C.) Spend time to evaluate, test, fail and find a model that could work. D.) Modify, understand the limitations of open source file; what does design need to move forward based on design, 3D printing limitations, and resources? How do we ultimately find a 3D print file that is a prototype that can be shared for all  to get up and running?

What technical knowledge and abilities did you bring to the project and what tools do you have at your home that enabled you to implement it? What materials did you have to source?

I’m blessed with an unconventional background as a licensed architect and artist. I’m a creative designer with high technical skills who understands how the prototype process works.  This defines what ‘Makers’ are. We understand technology, current machines, and how to push new ideas forward.

My current role as an elementary art teacher at The Lexington School allows me to teach 5th graders the fundamentals of 3D printing with a Makerbot Replicator+ in my classroom. It keeps me in touch with trends and equipment, and ultimately prepares this generation with a technology that will impact every aspect of the workforce they will enter. When I got Sylvia’s call about a dire situation and current crisis for PPE, I literally grabbed my classroom printer, filament, and support materials and set it up in my dining room. My primary goal was to create a prototype to be shared.

What started as a small idea to create a working prototype for a PPE shield in my dining room grew into something I could never have imagined.

Did the open source prototype files that you accessed need modifications?

To be clear, I’m not creating an original design of my own:  I’m examining the uploads of other designers from around the world, testing, and modifying to a need – and that’s the process of makers and prototyping. The beauty of this process is ALTRUISM. The file I’ve taken on to redesign and modify is the one I will, in return, upload to the original creator as a modification to share. Designs that work can be immediately uploaded and pushed further. The model I decided was the best to work with is from Prusa Research, a company in the Czech Republic. I took their open source file and had to make modifications based on metric differences and material reinforcement. Ultimately the greatest challenge is to find a 3D printed model that can be printed in a reasonable time. It is a SLOW process to 3D print which is the greatest barrier most 3D printers face.

How long did it take you to develop the prototype and were there others with expertise that worked with you on the development process?

This has been a breakneck challenge for me as a designer and I worked by myself initially to test and develop a design. I have the added benefit of being teacher at The Lexington School and to have strong support for research and development to push new maker technologies. When I woke up to the call from Sylvia Cerel, I contacted the head of The Lexington School and discussed the project. She immediately dedicated our equipment, resources, and material to sponsor this research to develop a prototype.

The beauty of open source files in the Maker World is that the design options and file sources are infinite. You look to find a design that is most applicable to you, but as a designer you must take on that design and customize it to your own needs. It’s a process of test and fail – just like any innovation process. I often quote Thomas Edison to my students, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”  Makers all over the world are challenging designs at breakneck speed. If Edison uploaded one open source file on a light bulb, I guarantee we as designers around the world would react and redesign. Thomas Edison only needed to upload one light bulb design to makers and there would be a maker’s response within a day that would make the perfect light bulb.

To take one idea with a small classroom printer to develop a prototype that has been shared internationally blows my mind.

The New Victory Gardens: 3D Printing May Save Lives from The Lexington School on Vimeo.

Has the prototype been used in small-scale manufacturing locally? Globally? Is there a feedback process to perfect the design?

Simply put, there has not been time to go through normal testing and manufacturing and I don’t claim to be an expert of manufacturing.  This is a prototype file that I’m sharing and supporting.  Due to the immediate crisis of PPE shortage the grassroots efforts of people sewing masks, gowns, and making shields has been at the level of the WW2 victory gardens. Members of the community are making and delivering aid in the moment to help healthcare providers in this major health crisis.

This one shield prototype I’m working on has been given to local nurses, doctors, and hospitals just as a test. I’m not within my means with a small printer to be a source of production. The protoype developed has been modified based on feedback and I continue to share the 3D printed file as it evolves to other makers in the community. I’ve received inquiries about the file from India, Germany, Brazil and the United States from many architecture firms who want to help.  Community partners we’re working closely with are Newton’s Attic/Dawn Cloyd and Grey Construction/Robert Lownes. The file has traveled and I’m here for technical support and feedback.

Do you see larger implications of this kind of project for the Maker Movement and for education?

Absolutely. I currently teach 5th graders 3D printing at The Lexington School and we are gearing up to build our own MakerSpace at TLS to apply to Middle School as curriculum. This is 21st century education and I believe a Design/Thinking mentality is one of the most essential components to early education. Teaching innovation begins with critical thinking skills and empathy. I was jolted out of bed with a need, looked at the resources I had, and worked to find a solution with resilience and creativity.  What I’m going through right now is the exact process I’ll teach, and I can’t think of a better teachable moment. I’m excited as a teacher to share my direct experience in a moment of crisis and how the maker movement and design can save lives. I’m also not afraid to show them my failures in the process. For me to share first-hand experience and use this as an example of solving an immediate crisis, I can’t think of more priceless way to educate on how one person can design with technology from a dining room table. The Makers are our future.

Are you planning other prototyping projects?

I’m not pursuing more projects. My passion for research and development couldn’t ignore this great urgency of protecting our healthcare heroes. It’s so difficult right now to sit by and watch this world unfold as it is. Altruism is my driving force. It’s a word I can’t live without and I’m always happy to collaborate with that drive to push innovation in causes such as these.

Photo images courtesy of Sarah Heller.

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Arts

Arts Tasting Menu

Hand-cut cultural delicacies from the Bluegrass region and beyond.

This week, interesting talks and presentations are featured.

Appetizer

Black Horse Men of Kentucky with Dr. Katherine Mooney. Speed Art Museum, Louisville. February 16th, 1-2:30 pm.

Mooney is Associate Professor of History at Florida State University. Her presentation will explore the history of the Black Horse Men of Kentucky. She will be signing her book, Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom Were Made at the Racetrack. The presentation is in conjunction with the Speed’s current exhibition, Tales from the Turf: The Kentucky Horse, 1825 – 1950.

Entrée

2020 Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Kentucky Theater, Lexington. February 5th, 7 pm – 9 pm.

The Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning presents its latest inductees into the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame. This year’s inductees are Cleanth Brooks, Lucy Furman, Sena Jeter Naslund, Sam Shepard, and Hollis Summers.

Dessert

Robert C. May Photography Lecture Series: Erika Larsen. Gatton Student Center, University of Kentucky. January 31st, 4 pm.

Erika Larsen, Mik’nuraq, 2015, archival pigment print.

Renowned photojournalist Erika Larsen comes to UK for a talk in conjunction with an exhibition of her work at UK Art Museum, Erika Larsen: Ritual for a Changing Planet. Larsen’s work appears in National Geographic. Her current work explores how indigenous cultures are utilizing ritual practices to cope with the effects of climate change on their natural environments.

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Arts

Arts Tasting Menu

Hand-cut cultural delicacies from the Bluegrass region and beyond.

More worthwhile museum shows in the region.

Appetizer

Picasso: From  Antibes to Louisville. KMAC Museum, Louisville. Through March 22nd, 2020.

About fifty of the artist’s works in ceramics and on paper from the Musée Picasso in Antibes, France, are exhibited for the first time outside of Europe. Might be wise to purchase advance tickets for this one.

Entree

Something Over Something Else: Romare Bearden’s Profile Series. Cincinnati Art Museum. February 28th through May 24th, 2020.

Romare Bearden (1911–1988), United States, Profile/Part I, The Twenties: Mecklenberg County, Miss Bertha and Mr. Seth, 1978, collage on board, Collection of Susan Merker. © Romare Bearden Foundation/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Paul Takeuchi.

The work of African-American artist, writer, and composer is featured in this important exhibition at the Cincinnati Art Museum. One of America’s greatest collagists, this exhibition features thirty collages from Bearden’s Profile Series, which is both autobiographical and also addresses the scope of the African-American experience in this country.

Dessert

Loose Nuts: Bert Hurley’s West End Story. Speed Art Museum, Louisville. Through April 19th, 2020.

Bert Hurley (American, 1898–1955), Loose Nuts: A Rapsody in Brown, 1933. Pen and black ink, brush and black ink, crayon, watercolor, and graphite on wove paper.

Louisville artist Bert Hurley was know almost exclusively within the African-American community. He was known in Louisville’s West End as a talented visual artist and musician. Much of his work has been lost but this exhibition features a handwritten and illustrated novella which takes place in the vibrant West End of the 1930’s.

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Arts

Arts Tasting Menu

Hand-cut cultural delicacies from the Bluegrass region and beyond.

This week, some not-to-miss tasty museum exhibitions in early 2020.

Appetizer

Vhils: Haze. Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati. February 21st thru July 6th, 2020.

Vhils, 2014, Lisbon, Portugal. Photo Credit: Alexander Silva.

The Portuguese street artist, Vhils, has his first large-scale solo exhibition at the CAC. Renowned for modifying the surfaces of large urban walls and creating layered work, the artist uses anonymous urban citizens as his portrait subjects. He also works in other media, such as screen prints, paper, wood, and more.

Entree

Body Language: Hunter Stamps and Mike Goodlett. University of Kentucky Art Museum, Lexington. January 25th thru April 19th, 2020.

Hunter Stamps, Vicissitude, 2016, glazed stoneware. Photo credit: Mary Rezny.

Two central Kentucky sculptors, both alluding to the human form in their work, are featured in this two-person exhibition at UK Art Museum. A subject of one of UnderMain’s studio visit pieces, Mike Goodlett uses molds he fabricates out of spandex to create his abstract work in liquid plaster or cement. Hunter Stamps, a faculty member at UK, creates ceramic work, paying particular attention to the treatment of the surfaces of his pieces. An interesting exhibition from two of the more innovative sculptors in the region.

Dessert

Andy Warhol: Revelation. The Speed Art Museum, Louisville. April 3rd thru August 21st, 2020.

Andy Warhol, The Last Supper, 1986. Screen print and colored graphic art paper collage on HMP paper Overall: 23 1/2 × 31 3/4 in. (59.7 × 80.6 cm.) Framed: 31 × 41 in. (78.7 × 104.1 cm.) The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. 1998.

An exhibition that has new things to say about one of the most well-known and iconic artists of the 20th century is an exhibition definitely worth going to see. Curated by the curator of the Andy Warhol Museum, and displaying objects from its permanent collection, the exhibition explores the influence of Warhol’s Byzantine Catholic upbringing on his art and his emergence as the celebrity high priest of Pop Art.

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Arts

Arts Tasting Menu

Hand-cut cultural delicacies from around the region.

This week, a Lexington-centric menu.

Appetizer

Kentucky Nude. Lexington Art League. Opening reception December 6, 5-9pm. Exhibition runs through January 5th, 2020.

The Art League’s The Nude exhibition has been a Lexington favorite for over thirty years. This year’s iteration, in keeping with the organization’s recent realignment of its mission, features work by more than fifty Kentucky artists. Curated by Lexington artists Don Ament and Helene Steene.

Entree

Robert C. May Photography Lecture Series: Sarah Lewis. University of Kentucky College of Fine Arts/UK Art Museum, Gatton Student Center Worsham Theater. Friday, December 6th, 4-5pm.

UK’s excellent ongoing lecture series brings Sarah Lewis to town. Lewis explores issues of racial bias in photography and the visual arts and the role they play in how we discuss issues related to justice and bias. She is the author of the best-selling The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery (2014).

Dessert

Amy Pleasant, Repose XIII, 2018, ink and gouache on paper, 22.5 x 30.25 inches

Amy Pleasant: Someone Before You. Institute 193, Lexington. Through December 20th.

Pleasant’s fragmented figures suggest both movement and stillness. The paintings in this small show utilize solid black against white backgrounds, and are non-idealized figures. The ceramic sculptures rest atop pedestals integral to the work. Another interesting show at one of the region’s smallest but most adventurous galleries.

 

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Arts

Arts Tasting Menu

Hand cut cultural treats from the Bluegrass region and beyond to fill your plate. This week the horse takes center stage.

Appetizer

Tales from the Turf: The Kentucky Horse, 1825 – 1950. The Speed Art Museum, Louisville. November 15, 2019 – March 1, 2020.

Edward Troye, Kentucky, 1866. Oil on canvas. Loan to the Speed Art Museum courtesy of a private collection.

No other animal is as uniquely identified with the history and culture of Kentucky as the horse. The exhibition of equine and sporting art illuminates the many ways that the horse has become part of our understanding of the identity of Kentucky into the modern era.

Entree

Andre Pater: An American Journey. The Headley-Whitney Museum, Lexington. Through November 17th.

Acclaimed sporting artist, Lexington’s Andre Pater, has been finding fresh and dynamic approaches to his subject matter for over 40 years. This retrospective exhibition of Pater’s work includes more than 90 works from private collections. His vivid and nuanced paintings are much sought after around the world. The exhibition captures the evolution of the Polish-American artist’s journey in art and America.

Dessert

The Sporting Art Auction. Keeneland, Lexington. November 17, 4PM.

Henry Faulkner, Keeneland. Oil on board.

A joint effort between the Keeneland Association and Cross Gate Gallery in Lexington, the auction will bid out almost 200 sporting art and related works.The catalogue is available online and you can also register to bid. Giddyup!

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Arts

Arts Tasting Menu

This week, a Lexington-centric menu filled with unique tastes.

Appetizer

9th Annual PRHBTN Gallery. Lexington Art League, Loudoun House, Lexington. October 18th thru November 18th.

Lexington’s annual October outdoor mural festival has an accompanying indoor gallery show at the Art League’s Loudoun House. Over 130 Kentucky artists show their work, hung salon style throughout the house. A fun, opening party kicks off the exhibition.

Entree

Arts Connect Lexington Open Studios Weekend. Multiple Lexington locations. October 19th and 20th.

Lexington artists will open their studios to the public. Many of the artists will be offering studio sales of their work. Visitors can watch many of the artists at work and will have an opportunity to discuss that work. A unique opportunity to see the visual arts community in their natural habitat and to appreciate the diversity of work being produced in Lexington.

Dessert

Lost Souls Project Presentation and Book Signing. Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library, University of Kentucky. October 17th, 6-7:30PM.

A graphic novel depicting the history of the Holocaust in Poland, the text of Lost Souls was written by Maciej Świerkocki, and was illustrated by Mariusz Sołtysik. Polish society has been struggling with the history of the Holocaust and the roles played by many Poles in its perpetration. Illustrator Soltysik is presenting his work based on the project in the lobby of the library and will also be signing copies of the graphic novel.

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Arts

Arts Tasting Menu

Curated, handcut delicacies from around the Bluegrass region and beyond.

This week’s menu offers tastes from not-for-profit, community-oriented galleries in Lexington, Louisville, and Cincinnati.

Appetizer

Ali: Beyond the World’s Stage. Art Sanctuary, Louisville. October 4th – October 27th.

Art Sanctuary is a community-oriented arts collective that supports local visual, literary, and performing arts in Louisville. This exhibition features photographs, many never published, of Muhammad Ali taken by photographers of the Louisville Courier-Journal. The exhibition is part of the Louisville Photo Biennial.

Entree

Bluegrass Transplants, Adrienne Dixon: Common Spaces of the Commonwealth, Dana Rogers: Phosphenes. Lexington Art League, thru October 4th.

The Loudoun House hosts one group and two solo exhibitions in this iteration of the Lexington Art League’s new programming and scheduling cycle. Reflecting the Art League’s refocusing of its mission as a community art center, all three shows exhibit the work of artists living and working in Kentucky, most in the Bluegrass region. The group exhibition, Bluegrass Transplants, curated by Joanna Skiles Couch and Samantha Jean Moore, features the work of artists who have moved to Kentucky. Dixon presents work based on iconic local buildings, and Rogers’ meditative photographic work partly intends to induce calming and reflective effects on the viewer.

Dessert

Painted 2019: 4th Biennial Survey of Contemporary Painting. Manifest Gallery, Cincinnati. Thru October 25th.

Manifest is a multi-pronged community-oriented organization that presents exhibitions in its gallery, supports artists through residency programs, produces visual arts publications, and offers art education at its Drawing Center. Paintings by 26 artists selected through a blind jury process are presented in this year’s biennial survey, which kicks off Manifest’s exhibition cycle.

Dganit Zauberman, Eventide, oil on board, 10″ x 10″, 2019

Digestif

Louisville artist Skylar Smith, featured in one of our recent studio visit pieces, is spearheading a project focusing on Voting Rights, to be highlighted in a contemporary art exhibition in 2020. Ballot Box is supported by a grant from the Kentucky Foundation for Women. An open call for artistic submissions has been issued and closes on October 28, 2019. The exhibition at Louisville’s Metro Hall will open in March of 2020.

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Uncategorized

Arts Tasting Menu

A handcut tasting of cultural delicacies from Lexington, the region, and beyond.

Although summer is waning, things are heating up in the visual arts across the region. Three not-to-be-missed exhibitions.

Appetizer

Interwoven: Joan Snyder, Judy Ledgerwood, Crystal Gregory. University of Kentucky Art Museum, Lexington. September 14th to December 9th, 2019.

An exciting exhibition of work by three women artists, including UK SAVS faculty member Crystal Gregory. Snyder’s evocative, dense work include markings, floral references, and writing. Ledgerwood’s colorful paintings reference craft and ornamental traditions. And Gregory embeds weaving with nontraditional materials such as metal and concrete.

Judy Ledgerwood, Pretty Monster, 2015, oil and metallic oil on canvas.

Entree

KMAC Triennial: Crown of Rays. KMAC Museum, Louisville. August 24th to December 1st, 2019.

This first triennial exhibition at KMAC sought submissions from artists who spent formative years in Kentucky. The group of twenty artists in this exhibition were culled from over two-hundred submitting artists and selected by a jury headed up by KMAC Curator, Joey Yates. The Triennial reflects the diversity of practice by Kentucky artists ranging from traditional artworks in weaving and painting to works in sound and video. UnderMain will have a review of this important exhibition this fall.

Dessert

Robert Colescott: Art and Race Matters. Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati. September 20, 2019 thru January 12, 2020.

This first comprehensive retrospective of the work of Robert Colescott, who died in 2009, brings the often controversial work of this artist who explored below the surface notions of race, diversity, stereotypes, and identity. An important exhibition coming in the midst of our heated national conversation about these matters.

Robert Colescott, Sleeping Beauty, 2002, acrylic on canvas.

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topical

What’s A Railbird?

Definition- A well-known track fixture, hugs the rails, stays close to the action, probably loses more than wins.

Well, now the word has taken on a whole new meaning, as the grounds of Keeneland Racecourse will be the site of a spanking new summer music festival, Railbird, on August 10-11, 2019. AC Entertainment of Knoxville, Tennessee, founder of festivals such as Bonnaroo and Big Ears, producers of Forecastle down the road in Louisville, has been engaged to produce the multi-day, multi-stage festival.

Mary Quinn Ramer, President of VisitLex, said at the announcement this past week at Keeneland that there been a desire for several years to have a signature citywide event that would strengthen Lexington’s brand both regionally and nationally. Working with local organizer, David Helmers, who was one of the organizers of the homegrown Moontower Festival, the partnership with Keeneland and with producing partner AC Entertainment, yielded a winning combination.

Ashley Capps, CEO and President of AC, spoke at the announcement of his organization’s focus on creating festivals, which include Moon River in Chattanooga, and High Water in Charleston, South Carolina, that have a strong sense of place. The combination of the beautiful, historic grounds of Keeneland, and the culture of music, bourbon, and horses in Lexington, made for a compelling addition to their festival portfolio.

The target ticket sales for this first year of Railbird is 10,000 tickets for each day. Premium bourbon and equine experiences and packages will be offered. The lineup of performers at the festival will be announced on March 25th, with a mix of musical genres on the stages.

The festival site, http://www.railbirdfest.com/, has additional information and a video teaser and you can subscribe to newsletter updates about the festival. In addition, look for an upcoming segment on WEKU’s Eastern Standard, hosted by UnderMain co-publisher, Tom Martin, featuring an interview with local festival organizer, David Helmers.

Railbird Definition= A Winner!

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topical

CivicLex Is Live!

For the past two years UnderMain has been collaborating on a new civic engagement project, CivicLex. Initiated by the board of directors of ProgressLex (now evolved into the board for the new project), UnderMain has been proud to partner on the development and realization of CivicLex. The aim of CivicLex is to, “…to build a more civically engaged community by providing easier access to information and building stronger relationships between citizens and those that serve them.”

A major development milestone was reached this past week with the project’s online site going live. The website, civiclex.org, allows citizens of Lexington to explore vital local issues in depth in one online location, and provides resources to explore the issues in more depth and to engage with those issues and decision-makers more fully. For example, the website has a searchable feature to identify a citizen’s council member and has schedules of critical meetings related to the issues the site is covering. In doing so, CivicLex provides tools for people to navigate what can often seem to be byzantine and opaque civic and governance systems and processes.

CivicLex developed an excellent brief video to orient visitors to the project and the website.

In addition to its online presence, CivicLex, has opportunities for Lexingtonians to participate in live events concerning issues of local importance. Over the past few months project staff conducted a series of workshops concerning different sectors of the city’s budget, and the budgetary sector reports are included in the website’s resource hub. It is important to note that CivicLex is an ongoing project and will continue to roll out coverage of new issues on its issues hub and through live presentations, workshops, and other forms of civic engagement.

CivicLex is supported through grants by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Blue Grass Community Foundation, and donations from individuals from across Lexington. Access to the website is free and users are encouraged to subscribe to the newsletter and make one-time or monthly donations.

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original works

Breaking: Robert Mueller to be First Falcon Heavy Live Payload

On the heels of the highly successful launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy Launch Vehicle carrying a payload into space of a cherry red Tesla Sportster with a dummy driver, the White House today announced a series of upcoming launches by Elon Musk’s company. The program of launches, dubbed “You’re Out of This World!!”, will include the now-iconic cherry red Tesla Sportster with live humans in the drivers’ seats.

At a press briefing today, White House Press Secretary, Sara Huckabee Sanders identified Special Counsel, Robert Mueller, as the initial human payload. Huckabee Sanders explained that the ability of the SpaceX to accomplish quick turnarounds of launch vehicles made the company a desirable partner in this initiative, approved “at the highest level of government.” She anticipates that the Mueller launch might be “in a matter of weeks, if not days.”

In response to being pressed by Jim Acosta of CNN about the intent of the program, Huckabee Sanders vehemently denied that the program is intended to impede Special Counsel Mueller’s ongoing investigation into possible collusion between the Trump 2016 campaign and Russia. While admitting, in response to a follow-up question by Katy Tur of NBC News, that, “It is not anticipated that any of the human payloads will return to Earth,” she protested the news media’s propensity to frame administration initiatives in a highly negative manner. “I can’t believe that anyone would see the selection of these human payloads as anything but the highest honor that can be given to an American in this or any world,” Huckabee Sanders stated.

During the briefing, the list of subsequent payloads was distributed. Due up next for launch after Robert Mueller is Deputy Attorney General, Rob Rosenstein. That launch will be followed by one with U.S. Representative and ranking minority member on the House Intelligence Committee, Adam Schiff, as the payload. Pornstar Stormy Daniels will be launched next because “We wanted someone from the world of entertainment.” In a somewhat surprising development, Devin Nunes, Republican Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, was listed provisionally as a launch candidate. Huckabee Sanders stated that his possible inclusion on the payload list is pending “how everything turns out.”

Huckabee Sanders also announced that the individuals launched into space would be honored during the military parade later this year, currently being planned at the highest level of the Pentagon. She stated that bringing up the rear of the parade will be a formation of cherry red driverless Tesla Sportsters, honoring “these brave Americans.” Others under consideration for future honors include Hillary Clinton and James Comey.

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original works

News Bulletin: Body Politic in Intensive Care

August 3, 2017
Washington, D.C.

Doctors at the George Washington University Medical Center are reporting that the Body Politic has been admitted to the hospital’s intensive care unit after arriving in the medical center’s emergency room in a near-comatose state. In a news briefing at the hospital, Dr. Herschel McLachlan, Medical Chief of Staff, reported that the Body Politic arrived last evening at the hospital’s emergency room in “extreme distress” with “significant, and life threatening systems failures” and “a near total collapse of vital functions”.

Attending emergency room physician, Dr. Sarah Rouseminheir, acknowledged the serious nature of the patient’s condition. Dr. Rouseminheir noted that it was apparent that the Body Politic appeared to be overwhelmed and incapable of responding effectively to the range and multiplicity of pressing issues such as climate change, Korea, economic displacement by automation, healthcare, and political chaos.

As soon as the Body Politic arrived emergency interventions to stabilize its condition were attempted, primarily through intravenous transfusions of multiple units of truth. While at first the treatment appeared to stabilize the patient, Dr. McLachlan reported that in short order violent seizures and rejection of the intravenous truth fluids ensued followed by repeated and uncontrollable attempts by the Body Politic to turn on the television in the emergency room to watch The Bachelorette. The patient was then transferred to the ICU for further diagnosis and treatment.

Attending ICU physician, Dr. Sean Aboujou, indicated that it is anticipated that the treatment of the Body Politic is just beginning but that there will no doubt need to be a course of long-term rehabilitation after the acute care phase. A number of significant specific conditions have been identified. The Body Politic has been diagnosed with Corpus Interruptus, a condition wherein the corpus callosum of the patient appears to be blocked, thus preventing the right and left sides of the Body Politic’s brain from effectively communicating.

Scaramuccimania, a condition named after its discoverer and rarely seen until recently, and characterized by repeated frenetic attempts to perform anatomically impossible acts on oneself, has also been diagnosed. During Dr. Aboujou’s presentation about Scaramuccimania, one physician in the press room was overheard saying, “Looks like the Body Politic has really f___ked itself over, so I don’t know about anatomically impossible”.

The treatment team is also looking into alternative treatments for the Body Politic’s well-known conditions of Empiricalaphobia and Ignorance Profundus.

Political leaders responded quickly to the news of the Body Politic’s hospital admission. Vice President Pence led a congressional delegation in a prayer circle at the hospital. Senator Bernie Sanders issued a statement, “My prayers are with the Body Politic. That is if I believed in prayer. This news brings more urgency to the need for a single brain system”.

The White House issued a brief statement:
“It’s a big problem, the Body Politic. They don’t have it in Russia. Just saying”.

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